History, Movies, Fashion, Paintings, Books
intimesgonebyblog:

Gen. George Armstrong Custer and his wife, Elizabeth Bacon Custer in the early 1860s.

intimesgonebyblog:

Gen. George Armstrong Custer and his wife, Elizabeth Bacon Custer in the early 1860s.

fuckyeahbookarts:

The Lost Sketchbook of Guillermo del Toro:

Filmmaker Guillermo del Toro put all his ideas for `Pan’s Labyrinth’ in a notebook — then lost it.

The heavyset man ran down the London street, panting, chasing the taxi. When it didn’t stop, he hopped into another cab. “Follow that cab!” he yelled. Guillermo del Toro wasn’t directing this movie. He was living it. And it was turning into a horror tale.

The Mexican filmmaker keeps all of his ideas in leather notebooks. And Del Toro had just left four years of work in the back seat of a British cab. Unlike in the movies, though, Del Toro couldn’t catch the taxi. Visits to the police and the taxi company proved equally fruitless.

Del Toro’s films — “Chronos,” “The Devil’s Backbone,” “Blade II,” “Hellboy” — typically feature magical realism. Fate was about to return the storytelling favor.

The cabbie spotted the misplaced journal. Working from a scrap of stationery that didn’t even have the name of Del Toro’s hotel (just its logo), the driver returned the book two days later. An overwhelmed Del Toro promptly gave him an approximately $900 tip.

The sketches and the ideas in that misplaced journal — four years of notes on character design, ruminations about plot — were the foundation of “Pan’s Labyrinth,” a child’s fantasy set in the wake of the Spanish Civil War.

The director, who at the time wasn’t even sure he’d actually make “Pan’s Labyrinth,” took the cabbie’s act as a sign, and plunged himself into the movie.

(Source: Los Angeles Times, via my-place-of-recovery)

THEN/NOW ∞ Princess Desirée of Sweden and Prince Carl Gustaf (later King Carl XVI Gustaf) playing with watering cans at Haga Palace in ca. 1941 and ca. 1948 // Princess Estelle of Sweden playing with her watering can at Haga Palace in 2013.

(via the-lovely-estelle)

valmayuk:

#Ickworth #lambs are growing fast (at Ickworth House)

valmayuk:

#Ickworth #lambs are growing fast (at Ickworth House)

thestuartkings:

John Graham of Claverhouse, 1st Viscount Dundee (c. 21 July 1648 – 27 July 1689)
Known as the 7th Laird of Claverhouse until raised to the viscounty in 1688, was a Scottish soldier and nobleman, a Tory and an Episcopalian. Claverhouse was responsible for policing south-west Scotland during and after the religious unrest and rebellion of the 1670s and 80s. After his death, Presbyterian “historians” unfairly dubbed him “Bloody Clavers”. Contemporary evidence of the time does not support this assertion. Indeed, Claverhouse’s own letters frequently recommended lenient treatment of the Covenanters In 1684 married into a prominent Covenanter family. Later, as a general in the Scottish army, Claverhouse remained loyal to King James II of England (VII of Scotland) after the so-called Glorious Revolution of 1688. He rallied the loyal Highland clans and, although he lost his life in the battle, led them to victory at Killiecrankie. This first Jacobite rising was unsuccessful, but Claverhouse became a Jacobite hero, acquiring his second soubriquet “Bonnie Dundee”.

thestuartkings:

John Graham of Claverhouse, 1st Viscount Dundee (c. 21 July 1648 – 27 July 1689)

Known as the 7th Laird of Claverhouse until raised to the viscounty in 1688, was a Scottish soldier and nobleman, a Tory and an Episcopalian. Claverhouse was responsible for policing south-west Scotland during and after the religious unrest and rebellion of the 1670s and 80s. After his death, Presbyterian “historians” unfairly dubbed him “Bloody Clavers”. Contemporary evidence of the time does not support this assertion. Indeed, Claverhouse’s own letters frequently recommended lenient treatment of the Covenanters In 1684 married into a prominent Covenanter family. Later, as a general in the Scottish army, Claverhouse remained loyal to King James II of England (VII of Scotland) after the so-called Glorious Revolution of 1688. He rallied the loyal Highland clans and, although he lost his life in the battle, led them to victory at Killiecrankie. This first Jacobite rising was unsuccessful, but Claverhouse became a Jacobite hero, acquiring his second soubriquet “Bonnie Dundee”.